Mr. Lodge GmbH · Barer Str. 32 · 80333 München · 089 340 823-0 · info@mrlodge.de

Relive the past in these historic castles


Selection:

Residenz München

vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
7
Die Residenz

Residenz München

The Munich Residenz, built in 1385, was the home and seat of goverment of the Wittelsbach dynasty for four centuries. Since its partial destruction in 1944, this historical residence, with approx. 130 rooms, has become one of Europe's most famous museums for interior decoration. Precious sculptures, paintings, clocks, tapestries, and much more can be seen in a room built in the appropriate style.
 
Altes Residenztheater (Old Residence Theatre)
The Cuvilliés-Theater, named after its architect, was built between 1751 and 1755, on the orders of Bavarian Electoral Prince Max III. Joseph. After the destruction of the "New Opera House" during World War II - from which only the wainscoting from the outer boxes remained - it was rebuilt in 1958. Today, the numerous theater-goers enjoy the luxurious southern German roccoco style of the theater.
 
The Treasury
Today, the treasury, founded in 1565 by Duke Albrecht V., covers more than ten rooms in the royal residence. Visitors can marvel at nine centuries worth of impressive gold items, as well as enamel, crystal, and ivory works of art. Among the most important exhibits are monastery-owned works from the early Middle Ages, as well as extravagant jewelry and tableware.

Contact

Phone: 089 290 671
Website: www.residenz-muenchen.de


Schloss Blutenburg

vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
10
Schloss Blutenburg

Schloss Blutenburg

The "Pluedenburg", situated on the river Würm, was built in 1430 by Duke Albrecht III as a country seat. After 1467, his heir, Duke Sigismund, devoted himself to building churches and castles, as well as extending the Blutenburg, which was one of his favorite places. In 1488, a church with valuble fittings was added to the Blutenburg, in which Duke Sigismund died 13 years later. After the destruction of the Blutenburg by the Swedish, only the church was left standing. The present main building was built in 1680/81. The palace church is filled with late gothic masterpieces and consists of an unobtrusive, single-nave building with a chancel closed on three sides. Wooden statues of the 12 Apostles and one of Christ and Mary from the 15th century are among the palace's treasures. Nowadays the international youth library occupies the main house, the Erich-Kästner-Memorial is located in the gate tower, and a concert hall and restaurant can be found in the farm buildings.

Contact

Phone: 089 891 21 10
Website: www.blutenburg.de


Schloss Dachau

vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
4
Schloss Dachau

Schloss Dachau

The Palace
The dukes of Dachau first built a castle on the castle hill, in the middle of the town of Dachau, in the Middle Ages. In the 12th century, ownership passed to the Wittelsbach family in Munich. Between 1546 and 1577, Duke Wilhelm IV and Albrecht V rebuilt and extended the castle to a four winged Renaissance palace. The palace was badly damaged during occupation by Napoleon's forces. Electoral Prince Max I did not have enough money available to restore them and had three of the four wings torn down, leaving only the west wing, containing the picturesque banquet hall with its wooden renaissance-style ceiling, which is considered one of the most impressive in Germany.
 
The Palace Gardens
The Palace gardens include a baroque linden tree arbour, a small forest, and an orchard. Various horticultual eras are tastefully combined here. The breathtaking view of the city of Munich, Lake Starnberg, and the Alps combined with the romantic atmosphere are well worth a visit.
 
The Café-Restaurant
A visit to the Schlosscafé for refreshments is recommended: The large terrace, which seats 350, is situated above the palace gardens and also has a magnificent panoramic view. The simple elegance of the interior, however is also worth seeing.

Contact

Phone: 081 312 799 278
Website: www.schlossdachau.com/


Schloss Neuschwanstein

vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
5
Schloss Neuschwanstein

Schloss Neuschwanstein

Construction work on Neuschwanstein began in 1869. Along with the Herrenchiemsee and Linderhof palaces, Neuschwanstein, which is located near Schwangau in Ostallgäu, is one of the most architecturally sensational castles. King Ludwig II of Bayern, who died before the fairy tale palace was completed, ordered Neuschwanstein to be built high on a cliff over the Pöllatschlucht, near the town of Füssen. With its towers and turrets, the palace looks like a castle from the Middle Ages at the time of the crusades. Inside, the palace was decorated with motives and scenes from Ludwig's favorite composer, Richard Wagner. The winter garden and the stalactite cave are based on Tannhäuser, the Byzantine throne room on Lohengrin, and the minstrels' hall on Parzival.

Contact

Phone: 083 629 398 80
Website: www.neuschwanstein.de


Schloss Nymphenburg

vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
16
Schloss Nymphenburg

Schloss Nymphenburg

The central building, originally planned as a hunting lodge, was commissioned by Electoral Prince Ferdinand Maria and his wife in 1664, on the occasion of the birth of their son Max Emanuel. In 1701, Max Emanuel added two side wings. In 1714, four-winged side buildings were added and the facade of the central building was renewed. The Bavarian Rococo-style "Steinerne Saal" and King Ludwig's I famous "Schönheitengalerie" (Gallery of Beauties) are especially worth a visit.

Contact

Phone: 089 179 080
Website: www.schloss-nymphenburg.de


Schloss Oberschleißheim

vista general
vista general
vista general
vista general
4
Schloss Schleißheim

Schloss Oberschleißheim

Oberschleißheim has 3 palaces, the new palace, the old palace, and Palace Lustheim.
 
The Old Palace
The Old Palace was constructed on the grounds of a manor house built in 1598, by Duke Wilhelm V. The manor was torn down in 1617, by Wilhelm's son, Maximilian I. The construction of the late Renaissance style Old Palace was completed in 1623. The Old Palace was badly damaged during World War II and restoration efforts couldn't begin until 1970. Today, the Old Palace houses a branch of the Bavarian National Museum, with two exhibitions located in the north- and south wings of the building. The Palace grounds also include Wilhelmshof and Maximilanshof, whose central gate and clock tower were built during the first construction phase of the Palace. The Old Palace also houses a restaurant with a beautiful beer garden - a popular day trip destination.
 
The New Palace
Electoral Prince Max Emanuel commissioned the baroque palace in 1691 from the architect Enrico Zuccalli. Construction began in 1701 but was stopped again before the shell of the palace was finished, when Max Emanuel was sent into exile in 1704, after his defeat in the Spanish-Dutch war of succession. The architect Joseph Ettner resumed work on the palace in 1765 and was almost finished when the electoral prince died. Inside the palace, there is the Bavarian State Gallery of European baroque paintings with many pieces of international importance.
 
Palace Lustheim
The Hunting- and Garden Palace Lustheim is located on the grounds of the New Palace, on an artificial island. It was built by Electoral Prince Max Emanuel for his wedding with the Emperor's daughter Maria Antonia in 1685. Many magnificent feasts and banquets took place here. Franceso Rosa's fresco on the ballroom ceiling is well worth seeing, as is the collection of Meissen china dishes, centerpieces, and animal figurines.
 
Old Palace
The old palace with over 200 rooms and the "Willhelms chapel" is one of the most important early Bavarian baroque buildings. Built by Duke Maximilian I on the site of his paternal manor house, it contains elements of local and Italian architecture. The Weinhold collection "evidence of the national piety" is housed here.

Contact

Phone: 089 315 87 20
Website: www.schloesser-schleissheim.de


Schloss Possenhofen

vista general
vista general
2
Schloss Possenhofen am Starnberger See

Schloss Possenhofen

The castle, built by Jakob Rosenbusch at Starnberger See in 1536, was destroyed by the Swedish during the Thirty Years' war and later rebuilt by Hans Caspar von Horwarth. Possenhofen palace changed hands often, until it was bought by Duke Maximilian in 1834. It is now most famous because his daughter, Sissi, loved to visit her parental home "Possi", even after she had become Empress of Austria. Today the palace is private property and is not open to the public.


Schloss Seefeld

vista general
1
Schloss Seefeld - Seefeld Palace

Schloss Seefeld

The estate around Seefeld Castle was first mentioned in an official document in 1302, as "Feste Schloßberg". Over the last few years, the present owner of Seefeld Castle, Graf Hans Caspar zu Törring-Jettenbach, has completely renovated the extensive grounds, which include the seat of several businesses and small tradesmen. Well-respected cultural institutions based in the castle include the award-winning wide-screen cinema, the museum, and the southern house hall, which is used for various events. The branch of the state museum in Seefeld Castle will remain in use for many more years and the successful exhibitions of the State Egyptology Collection are to be expanded in future. Once across the picturesque little bridge, an idyllic scene greets the visitor. The atmosphere of this cozy beergarden, cradled within the walls of the castle, draws the visitor in to enjoy modern, traditional Bavarian or Franconian home cooking. The restaurant was a brewery until 1916 and several features have remained to remind the visitor of that time.

Contact

Phone: 815 272 32
Website: www.schloss-seefeld.de